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Beat pink eye - keep your cattle comfortable this summer

Beat pink eye - keep your cattle comfortable this summer


By Blake Jackson

A recent study by the University of Missouri Extension highlights the increased risk of bovine keratoconjunctivitis, also known as pink eye, in cattle during warm weather months.

This infectious disease, primarily caused by the bacteria Moraxella bovis, can significantly impact herd health and profitability.

The study identifies two key areas for mitigating pink eye outbreaks: fly control and pasture management. Effective fly control strategies, such as insecticide application, dust reduction measures, and the use of face fly deterrents, have been shown to demonstrably decrease pink eye incidence.

Additionally, proper pasture management practices, including regular clipping to minimize seed heads and maintaining a dust-free environment, can help prevent eye irritation in cattle. These practices also promote improved forage quality.

Veterinarians play a critical role in both preventing and treating pink eye in cattle herds. In collaboration with producers, veterinarians can develop targeted vaccination protocols to address specific herd vulnerabilities.

Furthermore, they can provide effective treatment plans should outbreaks occur. Proactive collaboration with a veterinarian is essential for minimizing the risk and impact of pink eye on cattle health and economic well-being.

Photo Credit: gettyimages-peopleimages

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Categories: Missouri, Livestock, Dairy Cattle

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